Paper

The most useful paper for children’s painting is sugar paper, although old makeshift measures such as newsprint, wallpaper, J kitchen rolls, offcuts from printers plus the newer used computer paper, may be necessary at times.

Now that this practice is firmly established perhaps we can /ith afford to sit back and wonder if children need a large piece of torn paper every time for everything they do. The rprooi Dest size to have is one which fits the easel. A small amount of a ilnthig larger size is useful for different projects but to have to cut large paper to size for a staple activity is very time^onsurning and toout is iwkward because the pieces are so big. Some sugar papers come peg or bull- viSlbl£ f Jtostead of a v/all. V. Possi this n batten board I

It is a good idea to provide a covered bucket of warm water and a small bowl and jug plus some kind of container into which to pour the dirty water. He can then, with this improvised wash-stand, help himself to a little water and pour it away when he has finished. If this is not possible a pile of damp clean cloths, and a bowl for dirty ones, allows most of the mess to be cleaned off hands before properly washing in the cloakroom. In some nursery groups visitors have been puzzled, even slightly perturbed, to see apparently praying children with hands tightly locked together going in solemn procession to the cloakroom. They have gradually realized that this is a good way to ensure that accidental daubing on the way to wash hands is avoided.

There is a very fine line to be drawn between keeping painting activities clean and attractive and overdoing this. Many children will be put off by messy brushes, messy pots and a paint-encrusted easel. If their clothes are not adequately protected both they and their mothers may object to stained garments. On the other hand to stand over every painting child with a damp cloth ready to wipe up the least splatter or to make a child wait while we restore the easel to pristine freshness between each painting could give the impression that we think paint is ‘ dirty