Winding a Baby

Winding a Baby

The new mother is presented with a number of seemingly bewildering aspects of babycare to get used to in the first few days. It will probably take a little time to find out when cries are for hunger, and when they are just for discomfort indicating that the baby wishes to be moved or picked up. To start with, for a cry, it is a useful idea to try feeding first, and then nappy-changing or comforting if feeding does not seem to be the answer. Most mothers soon learn to differentiate between different sorts of crying.

Burping and possetting are common worries. Most babies need to burp (release swallowed gases through the mouth) during or after a feed, and you can help by holding the baby upright, for example over your shoulder, and rubbing or patting his or her back in the time-honoured fashion. Some babies burp more easily than others, and breastfed babies less than bottlefed, so do not get too upset if it seems difficult at first.

It is quite normal for babies to bring up (or regurgitate or ‘posset’) some of their milk between feeds, usually when they burb. This may sometimes look like quite a lot, because it is often mixed with stomach secretions. But this does not mean that a baby is unwell in any way. It is a nuisance however, and most mothers (and fathers) of small babies constantly have a cloth of some kind to catch the milk.